Bethlehem Pastor’s Conference and App Live

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bcs_pascon19_1920x750-2I just got notice that the #BCSPasCon app is now available to as a FREE download from both Google Play and the App Store. Or, simply search “2019 Bethlehem Conference” and it should come up.

From the app you can:
Connect with other attendees • Post on the activity stream • Read speaker bios • Browse the complete schedule • Read about your favorite exhibitors • Track #BCSPasCon on Twitter • And much more!

The conference is Jan 28 – 30. If you’re going, I’d love to connect with you!

Repetition Needs An Editor

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Schreiner_PaulBookDr. Thomas Schreiner’s magisterial Paul: Apostle of God’s Glory in Christ is one of my favorite texts on Pauline theology (see also Herman Ridderbos). Methodological concerns of a Pauline “center,” etc., are always challenging, but I think Schreiner – and the scholars that he has influenced – are often closer to going in the right direction than many others.

Here’s my question: did his editor see these?!

Some of Schreiner’s words seem nearly identical, mere sentences away from each other.

Here’s a few examples:

Some see this as “stuffy” orthodoxy and a bourgeois ethic.
4 sentences later…
Some may perceive this as a rigid orthodoxy that focuses on tradition and does not comport with the authentic Paul.
(p. 390)

The singular overseer is sometimes seen as distinct from the plural elders, but it is more likely that overseer is a generic term here.
1 sentence later…!
The singular for overseer is likely generic.
(p. 387)

No big deal, certainly, but it still left me bemused!

No big deal, certainly, but it still left me bemused!

Dr. Thomas Schreiner’s magisterial Paul: Apostle of God’s Glory in Christ is one of my favori

Leadership Tweets

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Would you add any others?

How to Pray When The World Gets Evil

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calvin_coinJohn Calvin’s prayer based on Jeremiah 20:7 – 9

Grant, Almighty God, that as at this day a greater and viler impiety breaks forth than at any age, and thy sacred truth is treated with derision by many of Satan’s drudges — O grant, that we may nevertheless constantly persevere in it, nor hesitate to oppose the fury of all the ungodly, and relying on the power of thy Spirit, contend with them until that truth, which thou didst once proclaim by thy Prophets, and at length by thine only-begotten Son, and which was sealed by his blood, may attain its full authority, that as it proves to many the savour of eternal death, so it may also be a pledge to us of eternal salvation, until we shall be gathered into thy kingdom at the coming of the same thy Son Jesus Christ.
Amen.

(HT: Publican Chest | source)

Mapping Out the Zealot vs. the Tax Collector

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How do we apply the fact that Jesus made room in the Twelve for both Simon the Zealot and Matthew the Tax Collector? Certainly, it must remind us that Jesus’ invitation was to a wide and deep mercy in God. Simon, who was ready to take down the institutionalized, status quo, Roman occupation is at one end of the spectrum. On the other, Matthew earned his bread and maintained a social status feeding off of the very institution Simon was seeking to destroy. Both of them need salvation found in Christ alone.

So are these political opposites, with the application being Jesus calls neo-socialists as well as fascists? Democrats and Republicans? Or does Rome function more as an icon of the passing-away-world, and not politics per se? In this case, Simon is the ascetic, jihadist, fundamentalist; Matthew the cosmopolitan, worldly promoter of any/every zeitgeist. Or is there some other taxonomy that these two disciples map on to?

Classic, Snarky, Ships Passing in the Night

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David Lose: [One viewpoint is that] the passages may or may not refer to homosexuality as we know it, but they – and all of Scripture – are conditioned by the cultural and historical realities of the authors and so offer an incomplete and insufficient understanding of creation and nature and so cannot be used to prohibit homosexual practice today. Rather, one needs to read the larger biblical witness to discern God’s hopes for caring, mutually-supportive relationships, whether heterosexual or homosexual.

PastorDaddy82: Classic speaking to the word without letting the Word speak to you…

LoveAndPeace: That comment is judgmental and indicates lack of value and respect for individual interpretation by all God centered people. Maybe the Word is not speaking to the author of the comment….? That statement cuts both ways.

Me: Dear LoveAndPeace,

Please stop being so judgmental and intolerant of PastorDaddy82′s comment.

You would have more value and respect for his comment if you understood that Bible verses may or may not refer to Internet comments as we know them today, but they – and all of Scripture – are conditioned by the cultural and historical realities of the authors and so offer an incomplete and insufficient understanding of creation and nature and so cannot be used to prohibit anybody from saying anything on a blog/message board today.

Thank you in advance for not judging my comment to you, but recognizing that is in fact correct, as nature itself reveals.

source

How to Speak Truth to Power?

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Michelle Obama: “He [Jesus] was out there fighting injustice and speaking truth to power every single day.” (source: ABC news)

True. But the question is, how did Jesus speak truth to power? As Spartacus, or as Julius Caesar?

Both Spartacus & Caesar “spoke” to the powers of their age. Spartacus did it as a rebel and insurgent, leading a revolt. And Caesar did it as the power, controlling and squashing those who abused authority they derived from him.

So in which way did Jesus speak to the Pharisees, the “Temple system,” and the political powers of 1st Century Judea? As Lord or Servant? And how should the followers of Jesus follow Him today?

To Do: Download Android 4.0 ICS today for Galaxy SII

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Attn: T-Mobile users

Unfortunately:

Most Galaxy S II owners won’t see much visual difference after the update. Based on the experience with Android 4.0 for the Galaxy Note, which was upgraded earlier this year, Samsung’s TouchWiz user interface will cover most of the Ice Cream Sandwich UI improvements. However, the many new Android 4.0 features will be welcome by Samsung Galaxy S II owners: Monthly data usage monitoring, an improved camera interface and widgets that are re-sizable and more interactive, to name a few.

Still, I’m looking forward to the upgrade.

I don’t normally keep Samsung’s Kies app up to date, so I’m going to have to make sure that is running smoothly before I go monkeying with the UI.

For those who have the SGII (or Galaxy Note), will you (have you) get the ICS? Sound off in the comments.